The Old Fogies go to Honfleur in France

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

The last destination on our trip was the charming seaside town of Honfleur in Normandy, its location at the mouth of the Seine estuary before entering the English Channel means it is very popular with visitors exploring the Normandy coast.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

The cruise terminal is around one mile from the town and we were greeted with a wonderful sunrise over the incredible Normandy Bridge that stretches across the estuary.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

Honfleur is considered one of the most picturesque seaside towns in France and gets quite crowded in high summer, thankfully it was a pleasant spring day as we made our way into the town.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

Honfleur’s port has been important throughout its history, it was originally founded by the Vikings and was the scene of plenty of trade with England. It is still a working port and one of the joys of visiting the town is to watch the fishing boats come in with their catch.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

We watched a boat bringing in boxes of scallops and were entertained by one of the boats that looked like it was ready to capsize with its load all on one side.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

The most visited part of the town is the Vieux Bassin with its tall wooden buildings providing a lovely backdrop to a small basin of water full of boats. This wonderful scene has been a favourite location for artists , The Honfleur School was an artistic movement involving Monet and Eugene Boudin who was born in the town.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

This art movement is considered a big influence on the Impressionist Movement. This part of Normandy is considered the ‘home’ of Impressionism and has attracted many artists, writers and musicians.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

Behind the Vieux Bassin is a labyrinth of narrow streets full of attractive gift shops, art galleries, boutiques and antique shops.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

Also in the backstreets is the unique churches of St Catherine which is the largest wooden church in France and St Leonard which has town’s old washhouse nearby.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

We took a walk away from the main town up the Rue des Buttes to look at some of the old houses on the hillside before making our way to the pleasant Jardin du Tripot.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

Nearby is the Eugene Boudin Museum and Maison Satie that celebrate the local celebrities.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

As we made back into the town, we looked at the old salt warehouses and sat near the remarkable 1900 Carousel which is still working and had children sitting on a series of strange looking animals.

© 2019 Old Fogies Travels – Photograph by Alan Kean

Honfleur is very popular and it is easy to see why, it is a seaside town full of history. Many of the shops sell local produce like local cheeses, the famous Calvados brandy and Crème de Calvados, a cream liqueur. The old buildings and port have attracted writers and artists for centuries and now attract thousands of visitors every year. Although the town does get crowded, there are plenty of gardens and even a beach to relax.

Old Fogies Travels are the adventures of two elderly Londoners (The Old Fogies) as they explore their home town and travel around the world looking out for the strange, unusual and absurd.

Our articles are published on our blog but also listed on the website of our friends at Visiting London Guide.com here

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